exploring the relationship between social science and software development methodologies: a blog by Pascal Belouin

During the course of fieldwork, the ethnographer can take on a number of different roles, which could be classified in regards to the degree of one’s involvement with the population he or she is studying. For instance, according to Junker (1960) and Gold’s (1958) model, the roles available to the researcher range from the ‘complete [...]

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§125 · March 16, 2010 · Practice · 1 comment · Tags: , , , , , , ,


Abstract It could be argued that discourse surrounding software development methodologies has evolved in recent years from a focus on technology and pure computer science subjects to issues of values, meaning and communication. This shift in the way software development is perceived in the professional world could be further explored through a Foucauldian analysis of [...]

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One of the main issues in the design of most commercial software products is what is commonly called ‘domain definition’. This activity could be roughly understood as the definition of the ‘objects’ and processes that the system will have to manage or provide support for. An interesting thing about domain definition is that it could [...]

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As I tried to show in my previous post, the apparition of agile development methodologies could be interpreted as a sign of an evolution of the discourse surrounding software development (and, therefore, software itself) towards social topics. Below are a few aspects of agile development methods that appear particularly significant in this context. As illustrated [...]

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After years of pondering, I have finally decided to write down the few ideas that occur to me when I start thinking about the relationship between social scientific topics and software/interactive system development. The starting point of this reflection is an observation that software development methodologies seem to be slowly drifting towards social scientific matters. [...]

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